Traveling with a laptop

June 15, '11 by Troy Hickerson


Seven Tips For Taking A Laptop Travelling

Taking a laptop computer with you when you go backpacking can pose some difficulties - how to avoid it getting smashed up or stolen? Here are a few ideas to keep your computer and your data safe.  As a quick summary, don't take your laptop travelling if you can't face losing it.  The chance of your laptop being damaged or stolen is much higher when traveling, so be sure to keep a good eye on it and have a place to survive if it no longer works.  Consider getting a good travel case for your laptop to protect it from accidental drops.  Just yesterday a friend was visiting my house on a trip and he had dropped his new MacBook Pro and the corner was smashed.  Fortunately it still worked.  He actually had a case, but had failed to zip it closed to the laptop fell out onto the cement.  Not good.

Lastly, don't forget to backup your computer before traveling!  An offsite backup such as SafeCopy Backup is ideal as your information will always be available even if your entire computer setup is broken or stolen.

Backup today!

Here is a link to more info about traveling with a laptop.


Posted on June 15, '11 | Comments0 comments |


More Friends = More Space

June 08, '11 by Troy Hickerson

Invite your friends, and you’ll both receive MB of additional space. 

Using the new SafeCopy software, you can now click the Invite button to invite your friends to use SafeCopy.  You and your friend will each receive 500MB of additional space.  This works for both free and paid accounts.

To get started, open the SafeCopy software and click the Invite button.  If the invite button is now there, download the latest software.

Posted on June 08, '11 | Comments0 comments |


When viruses become thieves

June 07, '11 by Troy Hickerson

 

The personal financial information of up to 210,000 unemployed Massachusetts residents may have been stolen in a data breach caused by a virus discovered in state labor department computers four weeks ago, officials said yesterday.  Names, addresses, and Social Security numbers, among other data, may have been taken, said John Glennon, chief information officer for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development.

 Agency workers began to complain that their computers were running sluggishly — a common sign that machines have been infected with a virus — and network managers tried in vain to clean the infected machines. They eventually discovered that the virus was capturing information being typed on the keyboards of infected computers. The cyber thieves might also have stolen information from the 1,200 employers that use the computers in state offices to enter information, and from visitors to the One Stop Career Centers who use the computers to look for work.

The state labor department website has posted more information for people who may be affected by the breach.

One important way to safeguard your data is to backup your computer to a secure offsite storage location.  SafeCopy Backup makes this easy with a Free 3GB account for life.  Backup today! 


Posted on June 07, '11 | Comments0 comments |


Memorial Day Discount

May 30, '11 by Troy Hickerson

 

Memorial Day is a day set apart for remembrance to honor those who paid the ultimate price for our freedoms.  Be sure to take some time today to consider the price paid by others so we can live the the freedoms experienced today.

May 30th through June 5th SafeCopy is offering a 10% savings using the code "memorialday" during checkout.

Posted on May 30, '11 | Comments0 comments |


Where does your bandwidth go?

May 18, '11 by Luke Mysse

 

Netflix video streaming is now the single largest source of peak downstream Internet traffic in the U.S., according to a new report by Sandvine. The streaming video service now accounts for 29.7 percent of peak downstream traffic, up from 21 percent last fall.

That puts Netflix above HTTP websites (18 percent), BitTorrent (11 percent), and YouTube (10 percent) as a source of downstream traffic during peak times in North America. (BitTorrent still accounts for half of all upstream traffic). As whole, “real-time entertainment” (which is mostly video streaming, but also includes streaming music) accounted for 49 percent of downstream traffic in March, 2011, versus 19 percent for P2P file sharing, and 17 percent for Web browsing.

Video files are so big that it does not take much usage for it to take over in terms of bandwidth consumed. But these numbers definitely point to a future where video accounts for more and more of the traffic on the Internet. As recently as last November, Web video alone accounted for an estimated 37 percent of Internet traffic.

In the big picture, an online backup solution is not what consumes your bandwidth.  In face it's only a very small portion of your internet consumption, however it is the data which you can not replace...so be sure to backup!

Source: TechCrunch and Sandvine

Posted on May 18, '11 | Comments0 comments |


Microsoft + Skype

May 10, '11 by Troy Hickerson


Microsoft buys Skype for $8.5 billion.  That's a lot of zeros.

In its largest acquisition ever and the tech world's most massive deal in years, Microsoft Corp. is buying Internet communications company Skype Global for a stunning $8.5 billion.  Previously, Microsoft's biggest buy was $6 billion for online advertising firm aQuantive in 2007.

Skype's software allows users to talk for free online using messaging, voice and video and can also connect them to a land line or mobile phone for a fee. Users will now be able to connect to Microsoft offerings such as Lync, Outlook and Xbox Live, while Skype will support devices such as Xbox and Kinect, the companies said. 

Skype was founded in 2003 and now has 170 million connected users who chatted for 207 billion minutes last year.  The combination, he said, will give Skype and Microsoft the competitive heft to combat Google and the Facetime video chat function from the Apple iPhone.

What are your thoughts about the Skype acquisition by Microsoft?  With most computing and communications platforms heading to the internet cloud Microsoft just made some large shifts in that direction.

Source: LA Times and Associated Press on YouTube

Posted on May 10, '11 | Comments0 comments |